Places That Will Make You Sweat Harder Than Scalding Mumbai

Places That Will Make You Sweat Harder Than Scalding Mumbai

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The highest temperature to be ever recorded in Mumbai is 108 °F. As hot as that is for Mumbaikars, there are places far hotter than Mumbai. Get comfortable in an air-conditioned room because just reading about these places will make you uncomfortably hot!

Death Valley, California, USA

The Death Valley holds the record for the highest air temperature on Earth at 134 °F and the highest recorded natural ground surface temperature on Earth at 201 °F. It’s also the driest place in North America and you can survive only 14 hours here without water. Pushing the limits of human survival, the Death Valley is scorching hot!

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Aziziya, Libya

Aziziya was once considered to hold the record for the highest temperature ever recorded on Earth at 136.4 °F. However, this measurement was declared as invalid by the World Meteorological Organization. In spite of that, ‘Aziziya is still extremely hot and sweltering.

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(Image credits: AllRefer.com)

Dasht-e Lut, Iran

Dasht-e Lut is a large salt desert and is one of the world’s hottest and driest places. A NASA satellite recorded the surface temperature of the desert to go as high as an astounding 159 °F. Gandom Beryan is a large plateau covered in dark lava and is considered the hottest area of the desert.

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(Image credits: pinterest.com)

Kebili, Tunisia

Kebili holds the earliest hard evidence of human habitation in Tunisia and dates back to approximately 200,000 years. It’s also one of the oldest oases in North Africa. Kebili became a part of the Roman Empire after the Punic Wars. The highest recorded temperature of Kebili is a staggering 131 °F.

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(Image credits: Mygola.com)

Tirat Zvi, Izrael

The meaning of Tirat Zvi is Zvi’s Fort and it is a religious kibbutz. It holds the record for the highest daytime temperature recorded in Asia at 129.2 °F. However, this measurement has been questioned and said to have been more closer to 127.4 °F. That’s still pretty hot and definitely hotter than Mumbai.

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(Image credits: Mother Nature Network)

Phalodi, Rajasthan, India

Phalodi, a city in Rajasthan, broke the record of the highest temperature recorded in India at 123.8 °F, amidst a severe heatwave that killed hundreds and destroyed crops in more than 13 states, causing hundreds of farmers to kill themselves. Next time you complain about Mumbai’s heat, you might want to remember this.

1200px-Thar_desert(Image credits: Wikipedia.com)